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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
we're really engaging diplomatically with china and other members of united nations security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions. >> making any progress? >> you have to talk to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy.
and this brings back sweet memories of when china was very isolated during the cold war. in the end, there's a whole new generation of people who have been much more sophisticated understanding, but that i would say it's a very strong autonomic response to the united states beefing up its forces in australia and then they wake up one morning and burma has flipped on them. it was eternal in terms of their faithful allies. these things caused a lot of consternation. so the old fear of diagnostically speaking in china is to fear with sand and travel without. these things happening around them excite them. >> how much does it add to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which ma
isolated. its main ally, china, is unlikely to let you in impose tough new sanctions, so it will probably continue to develop rockets and bombs. -- china is unlikely to let the un impose tough new sanctions, so it will probably continue to develop rockets and bombs. >> i spoke to victor, the fellow for strategical international studies. victor, we have become used to these north korean launches not working. how worried are you by the successful one? >> i think it was definitely a surprise. i think the general view was that they tried so many times and failed, with the last one being the most spectacular failure. this was a successful launch in which they demonstrated the ability to lift a payload into orbit, which suggests they have long-range ballistic missile technology, and that is a big step they have made. >> does it give north korea more clout when it comes to possible negotiations? >> i think that is one motivation for doing this, but it puts them a stronger position where they can go to those new governments in korea and japan and say they are stronger, but the main reason is stra
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
. >> reporter: the problem is there are very few options in terms of appropriate action. as you know china sits on the u.n. security council and has blocked efforts in the past to sanction the north korean regime. they are its only ally but a very powerful ally. it is not clear at this time whether china is willing to go along with any u.n. security council recommendations for further punishment of north korea. they are in violation of two significant resolutions but it is unclear what real authority the international community has in terms of punishing north korea further. jenna: interesting tie some of our top stories together. china continues to be a problem in syria. that is our top story of the day. jennifer, we'll continue to watch developments there. jon: watching the crisis in syria, a nation that continues to unravel. there are reports that more than a dozen died in a car bombing, many of them women and children. the state news agency say a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in a neighborhood outside the capital of damascus. we're learning forces loyal to president bashar
. and so what i'm hoping is that in 2013, the central banks of the united states, europe, and china will find a solution to at stop the growth of that disparity. because i believe it's not right there is such a big gap between these derivatives and the actual products. >> so would a resolution of the fiscal cliff in the united states mean that america stops running up debt, would that be a positive step towards resolving that problem, even though it could be a drag on growth in the u.s. economy? >> translator: do not regard myself as a highly educated economist. from where i am, i watch the debate and i see, for example, some economists such as the nobel laureate paul goodman believe this could be counterproductive because too many action of this type could damage one of the important factors of the u.s. economy. on the other hand, unless there is some limit to the growth of u.s. debt, particularly with respect to debt as related to gdp, this could serve in the end badly if there was no limit to it. after all, the u.s. economy still accounts for about one-third of the global economy
-party countries, the united states, south korea, japan, russia, china. china is a big player here, because they have the most influence. they have to figure out how to deal with this new leader. i mean, they've got nuclear weapons. they've got missile technology, but they're also very poor. they're also possibly their sending a trial balloon saying, we want to bargain. i don't know, because very few people have met this new leader and which direction he wants to go is still uncertain. >> so in a lot of all that, i mean, what do you recommend if you were actually advising president obama at this time to do? people don't know who he is. he, obviously, is trying to do the muscle flex here. the six-party talks have been a failure. they basically ended back in 2009. what would you recommend? >> well, i'm not privy to their deliberations. what i would recommend is, first, you do have to fulfill obligations under the security council. there was a violation of missile launching. but i think a more creative way to deal with him needs to happen, and it has to solve south korea, japan, china and us p
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
transportation. i'm concerned about education. i'm concerned about cutting in all of these areas that make china -- give china a bigger advantage as we move forward that give our global competitors a bigger advantage. that's what really concerns me. >> two quick observations. if you're in business and you're told we've got to make changes at our budget and you look at 6%, 15% of your budget, 9% of your budget, you've got to make cuts, you look at the 60% first and say where can we make manufacture she's cuts. talk about not endangering our ability to compete and win going forward, you don't want to cut those areas as steve has talked about eloquently many times, there are advantages which means you have to look at entitlements. and i think to michael's point, i think there's credit to that. two, i like the fact that boehner now is in a stronger position with his caucus because if indeed they find a deal, that means he can win a majority of his people over. i like the fact that nancy pelosi's in a strong position with her caucus. so the pieces are not only coming together substantively, they're c
? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting better each time out launching missiles and setting off nuclear explosions. >> on that note, how realistic do you think it is? and how soon do you think it would be that they would be able to i'm one of these long-range missiles with a nuclear warhead? >> that is the real question. this last missile test was real important because it showed that they were successful. they got it up into the atmosphere. it can go a long way to the united states. now, if they perfect nuclear explosions and start miniaturizing it, being able to put it on a
stolen dinosaur bones from mongolia china. the smuggler sold the skeleton to a new york buyer for more than $1 million. that is when it caught the eye of federal officials. homeland security conducted an investigation into the fishy fossil dealings and in october arrested the florida dealer. prosecutors calling him a one man black market in prehistoric fossils and yesterday he pleaded guilty to smuggling charges and agreed to give up the one million dollars dinosaur skeleton. it will be returned to mongolia and the smuggler facing up to 17 years in prison. if a giant stolen dinosaur can get into the u.s. undetected t what else can get in? go to greta wire and tell us what you think. that's why sheh the leader in mobile trading. so she's always ready to take action, no matter how wily... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's no
conference during a crisis with red china, and his aides were warning him to be careful about what he said. don't worry, i'll just confuse them. he did. ike often have bad syntax. i noticed in his private letters and memos were clear as a bell. ike was smiling, congenial but also tough. as vice president richard nixon once wrote that he was a more complex and devious man than people realized. quote i'm and devious in the vastness of the word, added nixon. i was talking to eisenhower's son, john, his dad, about the apparent balance between the sunny congenial ike and the cold-bloocold-bloo ded ike. john smiled for a moment and said make that a 75% cold-blooded. when ike was elected president, military, the top brass were hopeful that the former general could be counted on to spend more on weapons and the military. in fact, ike reduce military spending. he was always wary of the military heightening and the needs for weapon and mean. when he saw the pentagon estimate that the red army could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take thi
of uninhabited lands between japan and china. japan sent eight fighter jets after a chinese plane was seen near the islands. it was gone by the time they got there. china continues to claim the islands. the islands have been in japanese control for years. japan bought the privately owned islands in september. >>> some are calling it a break-through, north korea making its first successful long range rocket launch but less than 24 hours after liftoff a u.s. official tells cnn the country may not be in full control of the satellite. joining me is cnn contributor and retired u.s. army general spider marks. good morning. >> good morning. >> what does this mean? is this a setback for north korea? >> it's not a setback at all for north korea. north korea successfully launched something into an extra atmospheric orbit, albeit it's not control. they were able to build a three-stage missile and get an object into space. >> here is how leon pa net ta spoke about it. he spoke to erin burnett in afghanistan. >> this is a clear provocation. we've warned them not to do it. we've been very concerned about the
to be the ultimate range. 5,000 to 6,000 kilometers. 3,700 miles. china to the west here. in japan well within range of north korea were to be successful in developing this launch mechanism. here is hawaii. that's outside the range of the 6,000 kilometers. the question then begs how realistic is it that north korea would be a threat to the united states? >> through pro live raig they could be a threat to the united states. and if they were to hit our allies in the near range. in the south and also japan. those are the near-term risks. but proliferation could occur at any time. they were able to reach to hawaii ... bill: history shows they are not very good at this. are they getting better? >> only more tests will tell. you are correct history has shown it's been embarrassing for them. you would have to ask if you were rational why would you take a high-risk test like this with so many eyes watching? bill: you mentioned the obama administration. how are they reacting? was is our response? >> our response tends to look first to the yate united nation. there is talk of proportional sanctions being cons
kim three seems to can consolidate his power. we are waiting to see if this affects china and their soup harris: you mentioned the evidence that south korea has found that the north will be able to fire at us, at our mainland, possibly come in the next two years. is there anything the south is doing at this point? people are feeling imminent danger. >> the south issued that warning about the capability about the missile tests. there is concern about the region, but it is very difficult to stop anything like that. we have some kind of missile patriots in different types of missiles to try to stop that. but it is very difficult if you have a three stage rocket to be able to bring that down very easily. but we did see before that last test that south korea and japanese and american forces were put on alert. perhaps bring you down and casey came came into their territory. back to you. harris: david pifer reporting live today from bangkok. jon: the fiscal cliff is a sport is a way. looking beyond the deadline, short-term battle will have a long-term political impact. let's talk
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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